Mathew Brady: The American Civil War Photographer — A R T L▼R K

Arrowhead Freelance and Publishing

Interesting source for visuals if you are writing a Civil War history

On the 15th of January 1896, Mathew Brady died in the charity ward of the Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. He was one of the most prolific American photographers at the time, yet he died in poverty and in a state of deep depression brought on him by the project he is nowadays most celebrated for – his photographic documentation of the American Civil War. Brady was among the first photographers to fully recognize the camera’s potential for creating a permanent record of important historical events. But he is also famous for his portraits, which nowadays serve as an important illustration of the 19th century American society.

51rh4yeoWqL._SX342_Brady started his adventure with photography in the early 1840s as a student of Samuel Morse – an established photographer, who, thanks to a direct acquaintance with Louis Jacques…

View original post 703 more words

Advertisements

Author: Grandtrines

Like so many people, I am a paradox. I am a politically conservative vegetarian. I am from a Christian background, and still tend to like those values, but am a metaphysical astrologer trained in science who has an interest in the magic of ancient Egypt and a weird belief that some piece of our essence can live on a server. I live in Texas, but like chatting with my international Wordpress pals the best. I learn by teaching. Technically, I am a "Leo," but I am very, very Aquarian with a dose of Scorpio. I bitterly complain about Algol (and Algol personaliites), yet it is the one star that defines me most (other than Regulus). (Which, oddly, makes me an Algol personality.) I am a reclusive lover of peace and quiet who has the Ascendant in the Via Combusta (the most conflict ridden part of the zodiac). I am an incredibly private person with a blog with over 800 followers and 50 to 150 regular daily visitors. I could go on, but I think you get the picture.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s